Webinar Next Thursday! Beaver Dam Analogs and Post-Assisted Log Structures

Register now for next week’s Oregon Conservation Partnership Webinar, “Beaver Dam Analogs and Post-Assisted Log Structures: Cost-Effective, Scalable Methods for Region-Wide Stream Restoration.” Our guest presenter this month is Dr. Chris Jordan, Research Fisheries Biologist with NOAA/NMFS’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center and Program Manager for the Mathematical Biology and Systems Monitoring Program. Thank you to Dr. Jordan for sharing his knowledge, and to the sponsors of the Conservation Partnership Webinars, the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board and Pacific Corrugated Pipe Company.

Register here!

Summary:

The systematic and widespread removal of large woody debris (LWD) and beaver has resulted in simplified and degraded riverscapes. Historically, large woody debris and beaver dams were ubiquitous throughout North American riverscapes. Beaver dams and large woody debris have been shown to influence hydrologic and geomorphic processes in similar ways, creating fish habitat and spawning areas and promoting sediment and nutrient retention. The introduction of habitat structures has been practiced for at least a century, with restoration focused on the creation of discrete habitat features, often pools for fish, rather than emphasizing how structures could enable and promote processes. To address the scope of degraded streams region-wide, however, cost-effective and scalable restoration methods are critical. In the June Conservation Partnership Webinar, we’ll learn about two types of low-tech restoration structures designed to achieve specific stream restoration objectives from Dr. Chris Jordan–Research Fisheries Biologist with NOAA/NMFS Northwest Fisheries Science Center and Program Manager for the NOAA Mathematical Biology and Systems Monitoring Program. Dr. Jordan’s recent work has focused on the design and implementation of large-scale monitoring programs to assess anadromous salmonid freshwater habitat and population status as well as the watershed-scale effect of management actions on salmonid habitat and population processes.